Cancer circulating cells: biology and clinical significance
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Keywords

circul;ating tumor cells

How to Cite

Suchorska, W. (2019). Cancer circulating cells: biology and clinical significance. Letters in Oncology Science, 16(3), 7-15. https://doi.org/10.21641/los.2019.16.3.155

Abstract

In recent years, the so-called a liquid biopsy based on the analysis of the circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and / or DNA fragments (circlating tumor DNA, ctDNA) derived from tumor cells in peripheral blood becoming an interesting field of research. CTCs are cells that have penetrated from the primary tumor into the lumen of blood vessels and are transmitted in the body in the bloodstream. It is believed that these cells are a source of metastatic disease development, and their detection and analysis can be important in predicting the course of cancer development. CTC were first described in 1869 by Thomas Ashworth, who postulated that "these cells present in peripheral blood, identical with tumor cells, may explain the presence of multiple tumors of the same type in one patient ". Recent studies confirm the usefulness of determining the number of cells circulating in cancer as a prognostic tool and marker of disease progression.
https://doi.org/10.21641/los.2019.16.3.155
PDF (Język Polski)

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